New wave of ethical jewellery
2012/03/12
Either as a pioneering act or an answer to consumers' requests, jewellers are embracing ethical jewellery, from sourcing of materials and manufacturing processes to packaging and retailing, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

Either as a pioneering act or an answer to consumers' requests, jewellers are embracing ethical jewellery, from sourcing of materials and manufacturing processes to packaging and retailing, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

"It is becoming more and more important to assure consumers that what they buy has the right ethical approach from a sourcing and manufacturing point of view," Ulrik Garde Due, CEO of Georg Jensen, was quoted as saying.

In 2009, Georg Jensen initiated a carbon-neutral footprint plan in its jewellery assembly factory in Thailand by planting 21,000 trees. In 2010, the Danish jeweller launched a programme to monitor the sourcing of materials by its suppliers and focused more on recycling waste from its factories.

Another European jeweller, Germany-based Wellendorff, also joined the league in promoting sustainability in the jewellery industry.

"We reuse 100 percent of our water," said Christoph Wellendorff, managing director and great-grandson of the founder. The company will launch a new line of white gold jewellery set off by black enamel in 2013 using recycled gold.

Germany-based Niessing Manufaktur also made extra effort on cutting out plastic in the product packaging. Starting this year, the company, which is famous for its tension-set and wedding rings, will also begin to enclose a certificate with each piece of jewellery, on which the origins of materials are specified to keep customers well-informed.

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